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Archive for December, 2006

Looking for discussion and understanding, or maybe just looking for a fight

Posted by Chance on December 7, 2006

The House failed to pass a bill requiring abortion procedures to use anesthesia on the fetus. From the Washington Post:

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives, in its last days under Republican control, failed on Wednesday to pass a bill that would have required doctors to offer painkillers for fetuses before they abort them.

The bill failed by a vote of 250 to 162, short of the two-thirds majority required under rules that limit debate.

It would have required abortion providers to give pregnant women a brochure stating that fetuses can feel pain when they are five months old.

It also would have required abortion providers to offer pregnant women anesthesia for their unborn children during an abortion.

As a pro-life person, it is understandable that I would want this bill to pass. But I would think, as a pro-choice person, I wouldn’t mind a bill that provided anesthesia to the baby before being aborted. Although I disagree, I imagine Democrats wouldn’t like the “It would have required abortion providers to give pregnant women a brochure stating that fetuses can feel pain when they are five months old.” Perhaps that was the clincher, but I have a feeling, it is not. So, liberal guests, what would be the reason for rejecting a measure to provide anesthesia? Was it because the brochure was seen as an intimidation tactic, or should such a bill be rejected anyway?

Hat Tip: Neil Simpson

Posted in Pro-Life | 5 Comments »

New York City Board of Health bans trans-fats

Posted by Chance on December 6, 2006

Story here.

Dec. 5, 2006 — Following the New York City Board of Health’s unanimous decision to phase trans fats off the city’s restaurant menus, experts say the move could be an important step in saving many people from heart disease.

Restaurateurs and others, however, say the decision could have a devastating impact on New York’s restaurant industry, and it might not even make restaurant food that much healthier.

I don’t think I need to add much to the story to point out how ridiculous it is.

I would like to note this in the story.

“Some opponents of this ban have characterized this as ‘big brother in the kitchen,'” says Meir Stampfer, professor and chairman of the Harvard School of Health’s department of epidemiology.

“To those I would ask, ‘Do you oppose the regulations requiring employees to wash their hands? Do you oppose regulations limiting pesticide residue in food?'”

Big difference. Restaurant customers expect the workers to wash their hands, and they expect their food to not have poison. Also, customers know what they are getting into when they eat fatty foods. Unsanitary or poisoned food is a surprise, fatty foods typically are not. I’m sure someone from Harvard is smart enough to realize this if they thought about it long enough, but some people choose not to put on their critical-thinking hat when it comes to moves by big government.

The sad thing is, the only time the story mentions the idea that this move may not be the role of the NYC city council is in the quote above, from someone who brings it up, then quickly dismisses it. This is like a news article reporting on Planned Parenthood, and having the pro-life position summed up by a pro-choicer. So much for getting both sides of the story.

And speaking of “pro-choice”, whatever happened to the opinion of “my body, my choice”. Apparently not when it comes to choosing what kind of food we eat.

Update: Looks like it is the New York City Board of Health, not the City Council, as I stated originally.

Posted in Uncategorized | 8 Comments »

New York City Board of Health bans trans-fats

Posted by Chance on December 6, 2006

Story here.

Dec. 5, 2006 — Following the New York City Board of Health’s unanimous decision to phase trans fats off the city’s restaurant menus, experts say the move could be an important step in saving many people from heart disease.

Restaurateurs and others, however, say the decision could have a devastating impact on New York’s restaurant industry, and it might not even make restaurant food that much healthier.

I don’t think I need to add much to the story to point out how ridiculous it is.

I would like to note this in the story.

“Some opponents of this ban have characterized this as ‘big brother in the kitchen,'” says Meir Stampfer, professor and chairman of the Harvard School of Health’s department of epidemiology.

“To those I would ask, ‘Do you oppose the regulations requiring employees to wash their hands? Do you oppose regulations limiting pesticide residue in food?'”

Big difference. Restaurant customers expect the workers to wash their hands, and they expect their food to not have poison. Also, customers know what they are getting into when they eat fatty foods. Unsanitary or poisoned food is a surprise, fatty foods typically are not. I’m sure someone from Harvard is smart enough to realize this if they thought about it long enough, but some people choose not to put on their critical-thinking hat when it comes to moves by big government.

The sad thing is, the only time the story mentions the idea that this move may not be the role of the NYC city council is in the quote above, from someone who brings it up, then quickly dismisses it. This is like a news article reporting on Planned Parenthood, and having the pro-life position summed up by a pro-choicer. So much for getting both sides of the story.

And speaking of “pro-choice”, whatever happened to the opinion of “my body, my choice”. Apparently not when it comes to choosing what kind of food we eat.

Update: Looks like it is the New York City Board of Health, not the City Council, as I stated originally.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Favorite Christmas Songs

Posted by Chance on December 5, 2006

I got tagged by Josh to list my favorite Christmas songs:

Here goes:
Angels we have heard on high
Rockin around the Christmas Tree
Away in a Manger
Anything from Amy Grant’s Home for Christmas, but specifically “Breath of Heaven”, and “Emmanuel, God with Us”.
White Christmas by Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir

I tag, anyone who reads this and wants to do it.

Oh yeah, and my favorite “other” holiday songs are the “Hanukkah” song by Adam Sandler.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Favorite Christmas Songs

Posted by Chance on December 5, 2006

I got tagged by Josh to list my favorite Christmas songs:

Here goes:
Angels we have heard on high
Rockin around the Christmas Tree
Away in a Manger
Anything from Amy Grant’s Home for Christmas, but specifically “Breath of Heaven”, and “Emmanuel, God with Us”.
White Christmas by Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir

I tag, anyone who reads this and wants to do it.

Oh yeah, and my favorite “other” holiday songs are the “Hanukkah” song by Adam Sandler.

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

Protection vs. Preservation of Life, or "Why Pro-lifers don’t care about kids after they are born"

Posted by Chance on December 4, 2006

A common criticism I have heard of those who hold a pro-life position is that they “don’t care about kids once they are born.” In other words, those who are pro-life are typically conservative. Those who are conservative typically favor less government action and involvement when it comes to things like welfare and health care. In a Texas Monthly a couple years back, an interviewer asked Norma McCorvey (aka Jane Roe), why conservatives are pro-life, yet voted against funding in the state of Texas for health care for poor kids.

This is a reasonable question, and I will do my best to answer it in a few different ways.

1) Conservatives/libertarians believe government should be involved in the protection of life and less so in the preservation of life. In other words, the government must act to protect people from being harmed against others. However, libertarians believe government should not be involved in preserving life, because doing so will agress against the freedoms of other people (i.e. forcing people to pay for health care against other people). Conservatives may hold this belief, although, to a lesser extent. This is not to argue for one point of view over the other, I am just saying that philosophically, there is a difference between protection laws vs. preservation laws. Libertarians, especially, tend to view life as a negative right, not a positive one. As far as conservatives…
2) Many conservatives till believe in government actions to preserve life, just maybe not to the extent that liberals do. Most conservatives that I am aware of do not want to end welfare or government programs addressing health care, it is just that they do not support them to the extent that liberals do. Life-preserving measures are extremely open-ended, and it is a question of money and resources. It is, in my opinion, impossible to create a risk-free society in which people’s lives are never in danger. That is not a good argument against trying, but the point is, at what point does someone “care about the kids.” Is it when the government spends $1 billion, $10 billion?
3) Many conservatives/libertarians believe that the best way to preserve life is through less government involvement. The argument that if there are not more health care programs, kids will die seems to trump all other arguments. After all, who doesn’t want kids to live. However, someone such as myself believes that less government involvement in health care makes health care better for everyone. It is not so much an issue of me paying higher taxes – if I thought universal health care was truly the way, I would support it. However, I genuinely believe a less constrained health care system is the answer.

The point is, I am not trying to argue for a pro-life position or justify anything, I am just addressing the reasonable question that many liberals have concerning the pro-life position. For one, one can be philosophically consistent by supporting life-protection measures and not life-preserving measures. Secondly, many pro-lifers do support the preservation of life to some extent, just not to the extent that liberals do. Finally, many conservative/libertarians believe that less government, not more, is the answer to helping people, especially in the health care arena.

Posted in Uncategorized | 12 Comments »